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Sioux Falls Scientists endorse Decoding Neanderthals for describing the close
relationship humans had with Neanderthals, including breeding with them.

Decoding Neanderthals

Decoding Neanderthals (2013) - 60 minutes
Decoding Neanderthals at Amazon.com

Over 60,000 years ago, the first modern humans - people physically identical to us today - left their African homeland and entered Europe, then a bleak and inhospitable continent in the grip of the Ice Age. But when they arrived, they where not alone: the stocky, powerfully built Neanderthals had already been living there for hundreds of thousands of years. So what happened when the first modern humans encountered the Neanderthals? Did we make love of war? That question has tantalized generations of scholars and seized the popular imagination.

Then, in 2010, a team led by geneticist Svante Paabo announced stunning news. Not only had they reconstructed much of the Neanderthal genome - an extraordinary technical feat that once seemed impossible - but their analysis showed that "we" modern humans have interbred with Neanderthals, leaving a small but consistent signature of Neanderthal genes behind in everyone outside of Africa today. In Decoding Neanderthals, NOVA explores the implications of this exciting discovery.

8-14-18 New Scientist Live: the sophisticated home life of Neanderthals
We once thought Neanderthals were less advanced than humans, but Matt Pope will argue at New Scientist Live that Neanderthal families lived rich domestic lives. We once thought of Neanderthals as crude and unintelligent – not any more. Archaeological evidence suggests they were capable of symbolic thought, had some capacity for speech, and probably carried out elaborate burial rituals. They may even have taught modern humans new skills when the two species met and interbred. Now we are starting to discover what Neanderthal home life was like, and the caricature of prehistoric cave men couldn’t be more wrong, Matt Pope of University College London will argue at New Scientist Live next month. It turns out that prehistoric humans started living in “homes” far earlier than we had thought. This unseen revolution included Neanderthals who, like Homo sapiens, had complex tools and mastery of fire. Neanderthals lived in family groups consisting of five to 10 individuals, and cared for their sick and injured with a medical cabinet that included painkillers and penicillin. Contrary to expectations, some Neanderthals were even vegetarian. Others seasoned their food with wild herbs. And they were making porridge 32,000 years ago, long before farming was invented. Hear more about the domestic life of Neanderthals when Pope speaks at New Scientist Live in London on Sunday 23 September.

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Decoding Neanderthals

Sioux Falls Scientists endorse Decoding Neanderthals for describing the close
relationship humans had with Neanderthals, including breeding with them.