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Sioux Falls Scientists endorse How To Fake A Moon Landing
for exposing the myths behind science denier's claims.
Highly readable and entertaining this is an excellent book that
would be understandable and appealing to teenagers.

How to Fake a Moon Landing
Exposing the Myths of Science Denial
By Darryl Cunningham

How To Fake A Moon Landing (2013) - 172 pages
How To Fake A Moon Landing at Amazon.com

Climate change, fracking, evolution, vaccinations, homeopathy, chiropractic, even the moon landing - all hot-button controversies to which author-artist Darryl Cunningham applies cool, critical analysis. Using comics, photographs, diagrams, and highly readable text, Cunningham lays out the whys and wherefores to expose the myths of science denial. Timely and well researched, How to Fake a Moon landing is a graphic milestone in investigative science journalism.

Chapters

1. The Moon Hoax 4. The MMR Vaccination 7. Fracking
2. Homeopathy 5. Scandal 8. Climate Change
3. Chiropractic 6. Evolution 9. Science Denial


Darryl Cunningham is a respected science writer and cartoonist who spoke at the 2010 International Comics and Medicine Conference in London; he was also the keynote speaker at the Graphic Medicine conference in Leeds, England, in 2011. His previous graphic nonfiction includes Psychiatric Tales.

Andrew C. Revkin is a prize-winning science writer and a senior fellow at Pace University's Academy for Applied Environmental studies. He writes the Dot Earthblog for The New York Times.

4-19-18 Doctors who prescribe homeopathy ignore other medical guidelines
Family doctors who offer homeopathy - not recommended by the NHS - are also more likely to practice other bad habits such as the overuse of antibiotics. Doctors who prescribe homeopathy tend to flout a range of best practice guidelines. Primary care services that offer the alternative medicine to their patients are more likely to practice bad habits such as the overuse of antibiotics, according to a study of prescribing data. The UK’s National Health Service has been cutting down on use of alternative medicines for several years, with several bodies saying there is no good evidence to show that it works. Last year NHS England recommended doctors no longer prescribe any homeopathic or herbal remedies, although some GPs continue to do so. The British Homeopathic Association is taking NHS England to court to try to overturn its decision, with a judicial review set for 1 May. Defenders of homeopathy often claim that as these remedies tend to be relatively cheap, they avoid the use of more expensive conventional medicines. The latest study looked at all the 7618 primary care practices in England with data available on a website called Open Prescribing, which analyses use of medicines within the NHS. It was developed by Ben Goldacre of the University of Oxford and colleagues. Goldacre’s team found that 644 practices had issued one or more homeopathy prescriptions in a six-month period ending in 2017; these had slightly worse composite scores obtained by judging them on 70 standards of good practice in prescribing. The findings may reflect a lack of respect for evidence-based practice, says Goldacre.

7-8-16 Vets: Ban the use of homeopathy in animals
Vets: Ban the use of homeopathy in animals
About 1,000 of the UK's vets have signed a petition calling for a ban on homeopathy being prescribed to animals. The petition calls on the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons to stop vets from offering homeopathy on animal welfare grounds. But the veterinary regulator says "it is difficult to envisage any justification" for a ban. About one in seven practices offers some form of complementary therapy. Figures suggest about 500 farmers and 40 vets are trained in homeopathy. "It's been shown that homeopathy doesn't work, so it probably shouldn't be offered any more even if it is offered with good intentions." "Animal welfare undoubtedly suffers if people give homeopathy instead of proper treatment." (Webmaster's comment: More witchcraft for the ignorant.)

6-23-16 Stop vets offering homeopathy – placebo doesn’t work for pets
Stop vets offering homeopathy – placebo doesn’t work for pets
Homeopathy has no effect beyond placebo and is pointless in animal medicine, so let's end its use by those vets who still offer it, says Danny Chambers. People trust veterinary surgeons because their medical knowledge is the result of years of study and training at formally accredited institutions, based on sound research. You certainly wouldn’t expect to be recommended treatments based on a vet’s personal belief in therapies that have no grounding in science. And yet it happens. I’m talking about homeopathy, which has no effect beyond placebo. This is plain weird when you think about it. Animals do not experience a placebo effect because they are unaware they are being treated. Any perceived medical benefit is merely due to the care-giver effect – the subjective assessment by the animal’s owner or clinician. Or wishful thinking as it is also known. So, unlike people, animals do not even receive the psychological benefits from homeopathic treatments.

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How to Fake a Moon Landing
Exposing the Myths of Science Denial
By Darryl Cunningham

Sioux Falls Scientists endorse How To Fake A Moon Landing
for exposing the myths behind science denier's claims.
Highly readable and entertaining this is an excellent book that
would be understandable and appealing to teenagers.